Intimidating latin phrases

Doctors and scientists said that breaking the four-minute mile was impossible, that one would die in the attempt. We are nerved for the contest, and must conquer or perish.

Thus, when I got up from the track after collapsing at the finish line, I figured I was dead. The next gale that sweeps from the north will bring to our ears the clash of resounding arms! It is vain to look for present aid: none is at hand. Rally to the standard, and be no longer the scoff of mercenary tongues!

g., the universe, that was created from outside of time.

Sometimes the phrase is used incorrectly to denote "from time immemorial", "since the beginning of time", or "from an infinitely remote time in the past", i.

— Roger Bannister But if we fail, then the whole world, including the United States, including all that we have known and cared for, will sink into the abyss of a new dark age made more sinister, and perhaps more protracted, by the lights of perverted science. Be men, be free men, that your children may bless their father’s name.

Let us therefore brace ourselves to our duties, and so bear ourselves, that if the British Empire and its Commonwealth last for a thousand years, men will still say, This was their finest hour. — Sam Houston John Hawkins's book 101 Things All Young Adults Should Know is filled with lessons that newly minted adults need in order to get the most out of life.

Is life so dear, or peace so sweet, as to be purchased at the price of chains and slavery? I know not what course others may take; but as for me, give me liberty, or give me death!

The form irato is masculine; however, this does not limit the application of the phrase to men: rather, "person" is meant because the phrase probably elides "homo" ("man/person"), not "vir" ("men"). Means "from beginning to end", based on the Roman main meal typically beginning with an egg dish and ending with fruit; cf. Thus, ab ovo means "from the beginning", and can connote thoroughness.

Or, "from the outset", referring to an inquiry or investigation.

In literature, it refers to a story told from the beginning rather than "in medias res" ("from the middle").

Expresses the wish that no insult or injury be presumed or done by the speaker's words, i. Also rendered absit iniuria verbis ("let injury be absent from these words"). Said in the context of a statement of excellence: unlike the English expression "no offense", absit invidia is intended to ward off envious deities who might interpret a statement of excellence as hubris. Legal term pronounced by a judge to acquit a defendant following his trial.

Also extended to absit invidia verbo, ("may ill will/envy be absent from these words"). Te absolvo or absolvo te, translated, "I forgive you," said by Roman Catholic priests during the Sacrament of Confession, in Latin prior to the Second Vatican Council and in vernacular thereafter. Refers to situations where a single example or observation indicates a general or universal truth.

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